Nothing is Sacred in the PAO Life

My diagnosis of bilateral hip dysplasia in 2013 at the age of 39 was a shock.  Almost 2 years later, I can say without a doubt, that it was certainly life changing.  Two periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) surgeries within 9 months has also been life altering.  Looking back, I never would have predicted I would have had 6 screws in my pelvis, live with my sister in California for a total of 2 months, spend 7 of the past 11 months on a walker and/or crutches, not drive for a total of 5 months, own not one, but TWO sets of surgery recovery equipment fit for a nursing home, and learn how to be a patient person.  I have grown in ways that is hard to explain, so I will just say I am not the same person I was when I got diagnosed; I am a better person for it.

The other day I was thinking about my first surgery recovery and what is different (do not equate “different” with “easier”) this go around, and this story came to mind. I  was horrified when it happened, but now I can look back and laugh.  Nothing is sacred in the PAO life:

I was 7 days post-op PAO #1 (April 2014) and I was staying at my sister’s house for awhile post-op before I flew home to Colorado. I had to pee BAD (like the kind that you wait forever in bed holding it until you absolutely have to get out of bed because, on a walker, it takes forever and a day to make it to the bathroom.) The non-master bathroom was my bathroom and I had my raised toilet seat.  The raised toilet seat fits over a regular commode but is 6 inches higher, making it so much easier to passively flex at the hip to sit.

It was at night and I walkered gingerly to the bathroom, and sat on my trustworthy raised toilet seat and I started peeing something fierce. Relief! Then I felt that my bare foot was wet, I was perplexed, thinking, “WTF? Is the toilet leaking?”  So I look down. Much to my dismay, I realize I was peeing on myself and all over the floor because the toilet lid was DOWN!!! Prior to my little bathroom excursion, my 7 year old nephew went to the bathroom, put the lid down and then he was trying to be helpful so he put the raised toilet seat over the closed lid. I screamed in horror and my sister rushed in and I had a total freaking meltdown; bawling my head off, saying I was sorry. Being a mother of a 3 yr old and 7 year old, she didn’t care, she was just mopping it up with anything handy saying “At least it isn’t explosive diarrhea!” I just could not let it go, I was melting down like a toddler, bawling saying “I’mmmmm sooooorrrrrrryyyyyy….I caaaaaaaan’t doooooo thiiiiiiiis! Its only been a weeeeeeek”.   At the time, I really thought I could not survive.  Of course, we laugh about it now and that did not happen again!

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5 thoughts on “Nothing is Sacred in the PAO Life

      1. Hi I found your blog recently. I’m actually in the beginning stages of figuring out if I can do the PAO or if a THR is my only option. I’m in Denver and have been going to the Steadman Hawkins clinic in the DTC. I’ll be seeing Dr. Hugate in a week or so to get his opinion on my hip. Is there anyway I could contact you and ask you about your experiences with the Denver area doctors? I saw you’re post where you talked about all of the doctors you consulted with which was helpful.

      2. Hi Mark, Thanks for your comment. If you are on Facebook, I recommend joining the Periacetabular Osteotomy (PAO) group. It is a closed group, but once you submit a request, you should be approved within a day or two. You can message me on Facebook and I am happy to answer any questions you may have. If you are not on Facebook, let me know and I will email you. Talk soon, Jen

  1. Thanks – I just created a new gmail – I think I may start a blog to help me connect. I’m not much of a facebook person but will probably join that as well.

    my email is denverpaoguy at gmail dot com if you have any thoughts on DR’s in the area that would be extremely helpful.

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